Arushi Nath. Grade 8 Student.

I will be delivering a webinar hosted by iTelescope.net on 25 November 2022. 06:00 PM Universal Time UTC / 1:00 PM Eastern Time / 10:00 AM Pacific Time.

>>> Watch the Webinar Recording: https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/NNzDGOD1waGerjuMEXMe-2RpdRe-E1CHWw515CYoXSG4YqmdggdWpAdr1yNpHRza.TlVMDXi20g6hc7Qy

Presentation Slides: https://hotpoprobot.files.wordpress.com/2022/11/i-telescope-webinar-final.pdf

Register online: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_YNy-XwsGRAecCdMonMJn-g?utm_source=iTelescope+Full+List&utm_campaign=78001d9bf3-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_11_01_10_38_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ccda314cde-78001d9bf3-315653413

Citizen science and robotic telescopes have brought astronomy to everyone from school kids to backyard astronomers, and from those staying in rural areas with dark skies to city dwellers living under a light cloud. For the past two years, Arushi Nath, age 13, has been using robotic telescopes, open datasets, python algorithms, and middle school maths to undertake research on near-earth asteroids. Astrometry-related observations helped her identify asteroids and provide information about their celestial location as well as predict their future locations. Photometry involved taking images of the asteroid to find its magnitude. Longer observations yield a change in magnitude, which makes it possible to find the rotational period. For binary asteroids, she is using light curves to try and find the orbital period of the moonlet. As with all her research, she makes her datasets and methodology open source to reach out to other youths and citizen scientists. Her projects have won the Best of the 2022 Canada-Wide Science Fair award (Innovation), Gold Medal, and Excellence in Astronomy Award from the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada.

Check out the slides below detailing the Asteroid Science we will learn about and how Robotic/Remote Telescopes can lead to a lot of fun science.

Will also talk about how I applied my knowledge to undertake citizen science for the NASA DART Mission, including finding the rotation period of the Didymos asteroid and attempts to find the orbital period of the binary system.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s